10 Tips to Being a Better Tennis Coach

The following tips are for tennis coaches to connect with their students, gain their respect, and, as a result, get more clients:

1) Do not wear sunglasses when meeting your students for the first time or greeting them as they come to your classes. They should be able to see your eyes. You’ll make a good connection with them.
IF you wear sunglasses, as they approach you, taking them off shows that you care for them.

2) Have a positive attitude.
Your students should not have to know that your newborn baby was keeping you up all night and you could not get any sleep (like it happened to me). Even if you had a tough previous lesson with another client, you should reset and put on a smiling face for the next student or class.

Keep it positive and show that you are excited to see them every time.

3) You should always remember your students’ names and say it a few times during their lessons. Everybody enjoys to hear their name mentioned; it is a form of respect from your part.

4) Never pick up or talk on the phone during your tennis lessons. Imagine you are a parent who is paying for their child’s lesson but you see the coach talking on the phone when they should be in fact interacting and giving instructions to your child. Put yourself in the shoes of your clients; they want your undivided attention during the time they employ your services.

5) You should never be late for your lesson, otherwise, it should be free for your client. If you know you will be late, definitely find a way to let your student know ahead of time. My advice for you is to always get on the court at least 15 minutes before your lesson so you have enough time to get the court and any teaching aids that you will be using for the class ready.

6) Do not gossip!
Don’t talk negatively about your other clients, fellow coaches, or competing tennis clubs/organizations. If you don’t have anything positive to say, better not say anything at all. The negative talk will reflect on you and your clients will associate what you say with the feeling they have towards you. So keep your actions and words as positive as possible.

7) Show respect for your tennis students and especially for those who have stopped taking lessons with you. Even if they are not your clients anymore, your former students can be great ambassadors to promote your services to their friends and families.

8) Once in a while you should offer free lessons to those who cannot afford them. In addition to that, you could organize weekly get-togethers where your students and their friends can play together. It is a great way not only to offer your players a chance to get extra practice but it is also an excellent way to meet their families and spread the word about you and your services.
(I used to organise a 1 hour games-and-play session every Thursday evening inviting all my students to come and play. I would match them up according to their skills and parents would be participating in feeding balls to start the games or picking up balls, etc. It was fun!)

9) Look clean and smell nice.
We coaches sometimes have to rally with our students, therefore, it is important that we have spare clothes and a way to take care of our appearance before and after each lesson.

10) Find ways to constantly improve your knowledge about the latest teaching techniques, and share what you know with your younger fellow coaches. Be available to share your experience not only with your students but with their parents or anybody who is willing to learn. Knowledge should not be kept a secret. It should be shared so that others benefit from it.

Cosmin Miholca

Cosmin Miholca

Certified Tennis Coach

Check out my work at WebTennis24 where I share with you my best video tennis lessons, drills and tips for players, coaches and tennis parents.

Advice for Coaches Who Teach Group Classes

tennis coach
In my years of teaching tennis in Southern California, the mornings were dedicated to teaching mostly groups of adult players and occasionally some homeschooled children.

The adult group classes were mostly formed of players looking for a good work-out, fun, and learning how to play and win in tennis.

Years after I moved from California, I still get emails from my former students who tell me how much they miss my classes. That’s because I always considered the following…

1. Players like to have fun alongside friends or people they connect with.
In this regard, I tried to pair them up based on their personality and kept the atmosphere of the class a cheerful one by introducing fun games, occasional jokes, and constant encouragement.

2. Players like to get a good workout.
If they all look sweaty and out of breath at the end of the class, I know they will feel good about themselves for the rest of the day. A good workout means a better mood for the day ahead.

3. Players want to learn something new every time.
Players should be reminded of the proper stroke mechanics, strategies, and footwork. Try to bring a new piece of tennis information every time your students come to your class. They will appreciate you and the value they get out of your lessons.

Have fun on the court!

Cosmin Miholca

Cosmin Miholca

Certified Tennis Coach

Check out my work at WebTennis24 where I share with you my best video tennis lessons, drills and tips for players, coaches and tennis parents.

How to Minimize Waiting in Line When Teaching Tennis Classes

tennis coach
I am extremely grateful to see more and more tennis parents and coaches reaching out to me for advice based on my playing and teaching experience.

This time I’d like to bring to your attention a question a tennis coach recently asked: how to run your tennis classes so that the students do not have to wait in line for too long?…

Waiting in line is not only boring but also disruptive to the rest of the players, especially when those who wait begin chatting and the coach’s instructions are not being heard by the other players.

The following are some tips that I have used in my classes to keep all my students happy and get the best of my instruction:

1. A coach should never accept more than 6 players on the court (unless you are conducting a cardio tennis class where the coach feeds more and teaches less).

2. While some players (first in line) hit the balls that the coach feeds, the others in line should shadow the first player or do some tennis related exercises (ladder, cones etc.) – make sure your students are aware of proper spacing so that no one gets hurt.

3. A coach should line up the players (if there are more than three) in two lines and learn to double-feed (two balls in the air at the same time) so that two players (one from each line) practice their strokes at the same time.

4. Choose games that involve as many players as possible: 2-3 points before rotating and bringing new players on the court. Those waiting can be put through some drills (cones, ladders, etc.) or have them act as ball boys/girls for the ones who play.

Feel free to send me your suggestions if you have more tips in regard to keeping the class going and getting everyone involved.

Have fun on the tennis court!

Cosmin Miholca

Cosmin Miholca

Certified Tennis Coach

Check out my work at WebTennis24 where I share with you my best video tennis lessons, drills and tips for players, coaches and tennis parents.