Advice for coaches who teach group classes

In my years of teaching tennis in Southern California, the mornings were dedicated to teaching mostly groups of adult players and occasionally some home-schooled children.

The adult group classes were mostly formed of players who were looking for a good work-out, fun and learn how to play and win in tennis.

Years after I moved from California I still get emails from my former students who tell me how much they miss my classes. That’s because I always considered the following…

1. Players like to have fun alongside friends or people they connect with
In this regard I tried to pair them up based on their personality and kept the atmosphere of the class a cheerful one by introducing fun games, occasional jokes and constant encouragements.

2. Players like to get a good workout
If at the end of the class they all look sweaty and out of breath, I know they will feel good about themselves for the rest of the day. A good workout means better mood for the day ahead.

3. Players want to learn something new every time.
Players should be reminded of the proper strokes mechanics, strategies and footwork. Try to bring a new piece of tennis information every time your students come to your class. They will appreciate you and the value they get out of your lessons.

Have fun on the court!

Cosmin Miholca
founder,
WebTennis24.com

How to Minimize Waiting in Line when Teaching Tennis Classes

I am extremely grateful to see more and more tennis parents and coaches reaching out to me for advice based on my playing and teaching experience. 

This time I’d like to bring to your attention the question a tennis coach was recently asking: how to run his tennis classes so that the kids/students do not have to wait in line for too long?…

Waiting in line is not only boring but it is disruptive to the rest of the players especially when those who wait begin chatting and the coach’s instructions are not being heard by the other players. 

Following are some of my tips that I have used in my classes to keep all my students happy and getting the best of my instruction:

1. A coach should never accept more than 6 players on the court (unless you are conducting a cardio tennis class where the coach feeds more and teaches less).

2. While some players (first in line) hit the balls that the coach feeds, the others in line should shadow the first player or do some tennis related exercises (ladder, cones etc.) – make sure your students are aware of proper spacing so that no one is hurt. 

3. A coach should line up the players (if there are more than three) in two lines and learn to double-feed (two balls in the air at the same time) so that two players (one from each line) practice their strokes at the same time.

4. Choose games that involve players as much as possible: 2-3 points before rotating and bringing new players on the court. The ones waiting can be put through some drills (cones, ladders etc.) or have them act as ball boys/girls for the ones who play. 

Feel free to send me your suggestions if you have some more tips in regard to keeping the class going and getting everyone involved. 

Have fun on the tennis court!

Cosmin Miholca
WebTennis24.com